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Biology

This category contains 159 posts

Stop eating my plants!

If you’re like me, you may have had a sudden change of venue for your workday. I’ve been working at home for about two weeks now, since the coronavirus pandemic has triggered the vacating of pretty much every public space around the world. Yesterday I gave in and accepted that this was a long term … Continue reading

Can geese change when they lay their eggs?

It is later in March and it is currently snowing. Sure, we get late snowstorms, but there’s still several feet of snow, the river is still frozen, and the daily temperatures still sit below freezing regularly. This is definitely a late spring. But the Canada geese are back from their yearly migration, searching for food … Continue reading

How does soap work?

I’m purposefully choosing to write about topics that aren’t specific to the biology and epidemiology of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2, ie., the virus that causes coronavirus-19) for a few reasons. First, I typically post once or twice a week but things with this virus are changing daily so I won’t be able … Continue reading

Why are we all sharing pet photos right now?

I’m not willing to jump on some bandwagons. You won’t find me stockpiling toilet paper. I definitely won’t be buying a mask to wear which probably wouldn’t fit properly, would make me touch my face more, might give me a false sense of security as I rub my eyes after touching a door handle, and … Continue reading

Squat or sit?

I’m not very good at sitting at my desk at work. I have a sit-stand desk so that helps, but I still fidget a lot. I use a wobble board and I’ve recently added squatting in. I started this because I’m working on a couple figure skating moves that require, basically, a one legged deep … Continue reading

Where do the mice go for winter?

Back when I did outdoor programming, I used to give classes of 20 kindergarteners snowshoes. They would then run en masse across the snow. On occasion, you could see the poor small mammals, who had been happily hanging out beneath the snow, run out ahead of the kids. The kids and their snowshoes were crushing … Continue reading

How persuasive is your technology?

In the final week of Black History Month, I went looking for a Black researcher to profile and, thanks to Twitter and the hashtag BlackSTEM, I found Rita Orji, a Computer Science professor at Dalhousie University. So, today‚Äôs post is all about a review of the literature on persuasive technology for health and wellness by … Continue reading

Competitive triathlon training affects your DNA

Our DNA is located in 23 pairs of chromosomes. These chromosomes have genes located at specific locations that contain the recipes for everything made by our bodies. The ends of the chromosomes have telomeres, which are repeating sequences of specific base pairs (the alphabet of our DNA) that don’t code for anything and act like … Continue reading

Mini post: What happens when we share a passion

I’m not a big Valentine’s Day person, so I thought I’d look for a different take on the day of love and what I found was some amazing graphics and almost 180,000 people sharing a love of birds and science. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology has a program called eBird that has been operating for … Continue reading

#WomeninScience and Cyanobacteria have sunscreen

In light of today being the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, I went searching for research done by a women to profile today. I decided to start close to home and look through the biology department at the University of Alberta (U of A) where I did my undergrad and did not … Continue reading

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