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DNA

This tag is associated with 6 posts

Competitive triathlon training affects your DNA

Our DNA is located in 23 pairs of chromosomes. These chromosomes have genes located at specific locations that contain the recipes for everything made by our bodies. The ends of the chromosomes have telomeres, which are repeating sequences of specific base pairs (the alphabet of our DNA) that don’t code for anything and act like … Continue reading

Mini post: The Hulk and Gamma Radiation

I went to Marvel: Universe of Super Heroes at Telus World of Science Edmonton yesterday so I had to take a photo of the Hulk. The reason I had to take a photo is that when I teach the electromagnetic spectrum in an intro physics course I always talk about the Hulk when it comes … Continue reading

Star Trek’s intron virus

So, I think I have clearly established over the past several years of maintaining this blog that I am happy to need out on random science things. I find inspiration from questions people ask me, science that I happen upon, and things going on in my life. So when I was watching a Star Trek … Continue reading

Using DNA to see what bees do

To be honest, I had never thought about what we would do if bees and other pollinators disappear, despite knowing that they are currently under threat. But how do plants that depend on pollinators reproduce if the pollinators disappear? In various places throughout history, people had had to go out with tiny paint brushes and … Continue reading

What does it mean to be a carrier?

One of the things that my biology students often struggle with is what exactly does it mean to be a carrier for a particular trait. This is a difficult concept because it seems odd that we might have the information in our DNA for a trait such as a disease but we don’t actually have … Continue reading

Do Darwin’s finches actually have different DNA?

I have an undergraduate degree in biology, which means I have studied Darwin’s finches more times than I can count. The short version is that Darwin was on a ship that sailed to the Galapagos Islands. While there he observed many different species and variation within and between species. One of the groups that interested … Continue reading

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