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Biodiversity

This tag is associated with 6 posts

Higher Protection Means Higher Benefits

The oceans are, without question, under pressure. Overfishing, habitat degradation, pollution, and acidification are all taking their toll. There are however a growing number of marine protected areas. But that requires that these areas are actually effective. This is the question that Jacquemont et al (2022) asked. Specifically they were looking at the impacts of … Continue reading

Rewilding and Food Sustainability

Rewilding is a conservation approach that focuses on restoring natural processes. It involves less human management compared to many approaches to managing landscapes including both natural and agricultural areas. Keystone species, those that impact many other species, are fundamental to the success of rewilding, as is the return of wild versions of both plants and … Continue reading

Should we really plant all the trees?

I’ve wondered before if all the trees that get planted in the name of saving the planet are actually saving the planet. I mean I question anything that gets used as a one size fits all and trees seem to often fall into that category. Fagan et al (2022) set out to see how many … Continue reading

What are we actually importing?

When I think of imports I typically think of things that are positive. I would never have chocolate without imports for example. But new research shows that Canada, the USA, and a number of other countries are also importing extinction risks. This doesn’t mean that the imports are causing extinction at home, it means that … Continue reading

Losing traditional cultures as we lose nature

I was speaking with a student who was a member of a First Nations group once about her language when she made a comment that has stuck with me for several years. She said that when she moved to the city to pursue school she had to give up part of her language. This wasn’t, … Continue reading

Affected by climate change – Alberta’s Biodiversity

The Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Institute released a new report in June 2014 assessing the climate change vulnerability of Alberta’s land based plants and animals. 173 species were examined regarding their┬ásensitivity, exposure to risk, and ability to adapt. Not surprisingly, amphibians are considered to be most vulnerable to climate change. This makes sense because humans create … Continue reading

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